Wellbeing & How to Improve It - Mental Fitness: Converge International - Page 7



MEASURING
WELLBEING
We believe that the World Health Organisation
Wellbeing measure (the WHO-5) does a good job
of capturing the full concept of wellbeing.
The WHO-5 is a set of five questions as follows:
In the past two weeks…
1. I have felt cheerful and in good spirits
2. I have felt calm and relaxed
3. I have felt active and vigorous
4. I woke up feeling fresh and rested
5. My daily life has been filled with things that
interest me
Answers are based on a six-point Likert scale:

All the time (score of 5)

Most of the time (score of 4)

More than half the time (score of 3)

Less than half the time (score of 2)

Some of the time (score of 1)

At no time (score of 0)
Answers for each question are added together giving
a maximum score of 25 and a minimum score of 0.
Typically, these are then multiplied by 4 to give a total
out of 100.
Scores below 50 (out of 100) have been shown to be
related to reduced wellbeing. Scores below 28 have
been shown to be associated with high risk for mental
illness, suicidality and other poor outcomes.
Large scale studies of normal populations have shown
average wellbeing scores between 60 and 70.
The WHO-5 has been used in hundreds of peerreviewed studies and is a well-established and fully
tested measure of wellbeing with excellent and robust
properties6.
WELLBEING AND HOW TO IMPROVE IT | A WHITE PAPER FROM CONVERGE INTERNATIONAL | 2020
7

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