Wellbeing & How to Improve It - Mental Fitness: Converge International - Page 4



EVERYONE
WANTS TO
BE HAPPY.
A rich and satisfying life is not just good for individuals
it also has incalculable positive effects for families,
societies and workplaces. Lower conflict, lower health
problems, less crime… it is no wonder that countries as
diverse as Bhutan (which uses as its primary measure of
national success a “Gross National Happiness” metric),
the UAE (with a State Minister for Happiness) and New
Zealand (whose prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, unveiled
a “wellbeing budget” in 2019 which aims for quality of
life as its primary measure) have become serious about
The Australian Productivity
Commission’s draft report on Mental
Health (2019) estimates the loss of
productivity due to mental illness at
$9.9 - $18.1 billion per year. This does
not include the loss of productivity
that comes about due to reduced
wellbeing which is not diagnosable
as a mental illness.
4
influencing the wellbeing of their people.
Workplaces too have long been aware that wellbeing is
good for business. Satisfied and engaged people are less
likely to jump ship, more likely to spend discretionary
effort helping the organisation, are more productive and
innovative and spend less time on sick leave.
But workplaces have not always been sure about how
best to promote wellbeing amongst their staff. Some
organisations have delegated responsibility for wellbeing
to their OH&S function. This subtly suggests that, to
them, wellbeing is more to do with preventing accidents
or mental illness than promoting even greater flourishing
amongst workers who are already functioning well.
WELLBEING AND HOW TO IMPROVE IT | A WHITE PAPER FROM CONVERGE INTERNATIONAL | 2020

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